Praise

“This collection is a must-read – not only for those who plan on becoming parents, or who have experienced similar losses of their own – but for people who like good writing, and appreciate the personal essay genre for the difficult questions these writers confront.

In addition to loss, another emotion that unites these essays is love: for having optimism, for having conceived, for having grief – for having given life in all its many forms. The aptly chosen “How” and “What” of the title ask as many questions as they answer, and in doing so provide much-needed guidance.”

Elizabeth Ross

*

“As one of the first readers this book has had, I asked myself what comfort I might take from their stories, what wisdom. I suspect that word “wisdom” might make these writers squirm. While there may be much we can take away in terms of understanding and insight, it is not the writers’ intention to advise or instruct. If they give advice it’s mostly of the cautionary sort (“Expect anything”). The purpose of these essays, of writing them and publishing them together in this way, is less to provide an answer than to provide an example, less to inform than to explore, to share a story, or stories, that might have a wider resonance. And yet I did feel comforted as I read, more than comforted. I felt happy to be alive and in such company.”

– Kim Jernigan, from the Foreword, “Navigating Loss”

*

How to Expect What You’re Not Expecting is a brave and beautiful anthology that walks right into those tough, unexpected moments.

– Bonnie Way, (untrainedhousewife)

*

“That’s also why How to Expect What You’re Not Expecting doesn’t feel like an endlessly solemn or morbid affair. Because it is, at heart, an attempt to normalize miscarriage, and thus locate it as just one part of the larger narratives of pregnancy and parenthood, you actually come away from the anthology lighter than you went in. For moms and dads alike, it opens up a space to grapple with a kind of grief that remains extremely difficult to put into words.”

– Michael Hingston, of the Edmonton Journal

*

“This is a necessary book, friends. A book about loss and heartache, hope and love. A book of sorrow and consolation. A book brimming with resilience, beauty, grief, and above all with language that knows precisely what it’s doing.”

-Co-editor Lisa Martin-DeMoor on the release of  the book.

*

How to Expect What You’re Not Expecting brims with sadness, but it also acts as a container of light, helping us to see each other a bit better across unthinkable darkness.”

– Rebecca Higgins for the Telegraph-Journal

*

“This is a strong collection of writing from a group of very talented authors. I was impressed at the variety and the depth of the stories here…there’s lessons to take away from each piece. These are stories of loss, but they are also stories of great hope and strength. The book is very well organized and speaks a message as a whole, as well as individually from the different authors. Well done–a worthwhile read and a good book to have on your shelf. I’ll be recommending this book to many friends–both those that have experienced deep loss themselves, as well as those who are simply walking through the regular ups and downs of life. There’s something here for everyone.”

– Amazon reader

*

“What an interesting and helpful book! The essays in this collection are genuine, wise, and sometimes even funny. The writing is first rate, and the stories are not soon forgotten.”

– Amazon reader

*

“Each of the twenty essays in this anthology takes the reader on a journey, not only through the unexpected loss related to pregnancy and parenthood but also through the struggles of each writer in the telling. This is a book to read more than once. It is a book to be shared. Hopefully it will inspire others to give voice to their own unspoken stories… I think this book is important because of the variety of stories it contains and how, together, they bear witness to losses that are individual and yet somehow universal. This book is food for thought and reflection, for anyone – but for those going through such a loss, it opens a window to possibilities, and offers reason to hope.”

– Janet Baker, in The Current.

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